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Coming This Fall: All LAX – JFK Delta Flights on 767s with Delta One Direct Aisle Access!

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Rene’s Points For Better Travel, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Rene’s Points For Better Travel and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


A Delta Air Lines 767-300 (tail number N177DN) departs from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). (Photo: ©iStock.com/Angel Di Bilio)
A Delta Air Lines 767-300 (tail number N177DN) departs from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX).
(Photo: ©iStock.com/Angel Di Bilio)

Delta will discontinue using a potpourri of jets on the LAX-JFK line this fall (maybe answering Rene’s question from 2017 if this really is a competitive premium offering for the market anymore). Instead, 767-300s will be the route’s sole aircraft.

Australian Business Traveller’s Chris Chamberlain writes the change goes into effect Monday, November 4. Delta will — as of this post — then become the only airline exclusively offering widebodies between LAX and JFK that includes direct aisle access in business class. (Although, we know United and American can’t be far behind.)

How is This Different from Now?

Several Delta aircraft operate flights between JFK and LAX: 767-300s (review here), 767-400s, A330-300s (-200 review here), and 757-200s (review here).

Flying only 767-300s means some differences in Delta One and coach. (Keep in mind this not the 767-400, which is in the process of being upgraded.)

Delta One

Delta One already is offered on all flights between JFK and LAX.

But the move ensures all Delta One seats on the route have direct aisle access: 36 seats, in a 1-2-1 configuration. The 757-200 version of Delta One offers lie-flat seats — but only 16 in a 2-2 configuration.

Delta One on the 757-200.

The 767 Delta One can be a tight squeeze (definitely a first world problem!) but that’s better than no aisle access, which is the case in the 757s (agree?).

Delta One: 767-300 style!

It’s a bummer that the A330’s Delta One — the best domestic Delta One product — won’t be available anymore on this route.

Upgrade Opportunities?

All widebodies means lots of Delta One seats — and, obviously, upgrades aplenty to Delta One. Right?

Yes, all Medallions are eligible for domestic Delta One upgrades. Per Delta: “With all Tiers of Medallion Status, you are eligible for Unlimited Complimentary Upgrades to First Class and Delta Comfort+® as well as day-of-departure Unlimited Complimentary Upgrades to the Delta One® experience on flights within the U.S. 50 – including flights to Hawaii.” (Bold mine)

Let’s no get too excited.

Delta no doubt implemented this change so they could sell more Delta One seats — not charitably bless Medallions with free upgrades.

Domestic Delta One is a great opportunity to use Regional Upgrade certificates. In fact, that will probably be the only way many Medallions will see complimentary upgrades.

I’ve flown between LAX and JFK about ten times as a Gold, Platinum, and Diamond — and never once been upgraded to Delta One. Even as 1) a Diamond 2) using a Regional Upgrade cert 3) on a Saturday, I was shut out on a 767-300.

Exit Rows

The 767-300’s only exit rows seats are in rows 20 & 21 — part of Comfort+.

Seat 21A (exit row) on a Delta 767-300.
Seat 21A (exit row) on a Delta 767-300.

Take note, Silver and Gold Medallions and those who try to purchase exit row seats: there are no preferred seat exit rows on these aircraft. Only C+. Only Platinum and Diamond Medallions may be upgraded to C+ shortly after ticketing. (Or, of course, people who actually buy C+ seats. Remember there are now two C+ fare classes.)

If you aren’t Platinum or Diamond and plan on flying between LAX and JFK, now is a great time to make the leap. You can earn some fast MQMs through a Delta American Express Platinum or Delta American Express Reserve card sign up bonus. Also, consider taking an Elite Mileage Run or two.

While not an exit row, I will dearly miss row 35 on the transcon 757-200s.

My mother-in-law and wife kicking back in a 757-200's row 35 during a flight from JFK to LAX.
My mother-in-law and wife kicking back in a 757-200’s row 35 during a flight from JFK to LAX.

Take advantage of them while you can on the LAX-JFK route — or whatever lines the planes move to next!

Going Wide

Plenty of people don’t like 767s but, personally, I always enjoy flying them. LAX to JFK (and vice versa) is probably the United States’ most prestigious route; it should be served by wide-body aircraft.

What do you think about the LAX-JFK going exclusively to the 767-300s? Please share your thoughts in the Comment section below! – Chris

 

 

 

Rene’s Points For Better Travel, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Rene’s Points For Better Travel and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


Responses are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser's responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

4 Comments

  1. I’ve made this trip in Delta One many times over the past several years, using miles or certs to upgrade. I enjoy the odd-row window seats, which are more private, and especially i1A and 1D for their larger foot well. But there is one big drawback to this aircraft, and that is itsAVOD system, which is showing its age. The touchscreens almost never work properly (though the wired remotes help overcome that drawback); and the screens themselves are small, dim, and low-resolution. The AVOD systems on the 757-200 and A-330 are much better.

  2. Thanks for the update. I fly the LAX-JFK route every three weeks and as a Diamond am upgraded about 50% of the time. Most of those are complimentary while a few are using certs. I don’t remember ever using a cert and being denied. I think the key is strategically picking the aircraft (757 vs 767, 76W, 76Z, 76D, etc) and the flight days (Tuesdays are better than Mondays, etc). Fortunately, I have flexibility in my schedule. Great to see some consistency in the aircraft – always hit or miss on their age and quality

  3. My wife and I flew (paid) Delta One from DUB – ATL last Wednesday on a 767 and I noted seven empty seats. Not a good sign for anyone hoping for an upgrade.

  4. ZACHARY SIMONTON Reply

    They should use their newest widebody planes on LAX-JFK/JFK-LAX.

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