Travel Related

Another Delta Airbus A220 Issue — Flight Diverted After Navigation Glitch

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr
Rene’s Points For Better Travel, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Rene’s Points For Better Travel and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


We wrote earlier this month about some concerns over Delta’s brand new Airbus A220s. A new problem arose Thursday when Delta flight 2665 from Denver to Seattle diverted to Salt Lake City following an onboard navigation system malfunction.

A Delta Air Lines Airbus A220-100, tail number N116DU, is seen at gate C2 of Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC).
A Delta Air Lines Airbus A220-100, tail number N116DU, is seen at gate C2 of Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC).

Shortly after passing Jackson, Wyoming, the aircraft (tail number N124DU) turned left and headed for SLC. Simple Flying’s Jay Singh writes  “According to (a) passenger, the captain announced that they needed to divert to an airport with ‘VFR’ weather.” (“VFR” is an abbreviation for “Visual Flight Rules.” To put it very crudely, VFR rules mean pilots don’t have to rely completely on instruments to navigate approaches.)

The aircraft returned to service yesterday when operating Delta flight 1279 from SLC to Seattle.

Are You Concerned About the Airbus 220?

All’s well that ends well, I guess.

But is this latest A220 hiccup enough to make your rethink any itineraries involving the new aircraft? Or are you confident this is just another benign “teething” problem?

Please share your thoughts in the below Comments section!

–Chris

Featured image courtesy of Delta News Hub

Rene’s Points For Better Travel, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Rene’s Points For Better Travel and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


Responses are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser's responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

3 Comments

  1. Considering the Max problems and now this, the question in my mind is whether aircraft being currently built are being “over engineered” with the electronics? The evolution away from “mechanical” to”fly by wire” and similar technologies seems to generate a whole new set of challenges.

  2. Brandon

    This isn’t news. Every new aircraft has
    Teething issues and then usually engine teething issues which are a completely separate manufacturer. If you go and look at the launch kf any new aircraft you will find a list of problems in the first few months. This plane has had no true issues with the exception of an engine failure. Nothing even close to what the 737Max & Boeing have been dealing with

Write A Comment

BoardingArea