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Congressman Calls for Mandatory Face Masks on Flights

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Rene’s Points For Better Travel, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Rene’s Points For Better Travel and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


We might be one step closer to a law mandating face masks on airline flights. Plus, Hilton has teamed up with a cleaning giant and medical institution to set its new cleaning standards.

Those are some of the day’s travel-related headlines and stories I thought you, too, may find interesting.

Mask-Wearing While Traveling May Become a Law?

Tennessee representative Steve Cohen was on a flight last week — and noticed not many people wore face masks.

The Hill reports he sent a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Robert Redfield and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Administrator Stephen Dickson.

“As air travel continues to increase while the country slowly starts to reopen, it’s imperative that the flying public feel safe and comfortable in doing so,” he wrote. “This should include the requirement of masks, which will accomplish this goal and protect both crew members and passengers.”

Check Out Air Asia’s New Cabin Crew Uniforms!

Speaking of masks, Air Asia unveiled — or veiled? — its new uniforms for flight attendants.

Hilton, Lysol, and Mayo Clinic Join Forces

How’s this for a triple play? Hilton, Lysol, and the Mayo Clinic have developed a new cleanliness program for the hotel giant.

Other Travel Headlines

Why Are Airlines Adding So Many Random Connecting Flights? Blame the U.S. Relief Package

25 Dutch teens just completed a 5-week sea voyage after coronavirus restrictions left them stranded in the Caribbean

California’s ‘island of romance’ crippled by virus

— Chris

Featured image: ©iStock.com/asiandelight

Rene’s Points For Better Travel, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Rene’s Points For Better Travel and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


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10 Comments

  1. Barry Graham Reply

    Measures should be based on facts, not on fear and opinions. I understand that nobody knows for sure what the facts are but his is just one opinion. This is one from a doctor. A few weeks ago David Powell, a physician and medical adviser to the International Air Transport Association, was quoted here:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-02-06/want-to-avoid-virus-forget-face-masks-top-airline-doctor-says

    Q: Is there a risk of becoming contaminated with the virus on a plane?

    A: The risk of catching a serious viral infection on an aircraft is low. The air supply to a modern airliner is very different from a movie theater or an office building. The air is a combination of fresh air and recirculated air, about half each. The recirculated air goes through filters of the exact same type that we use in surgical operating theaters. That supplied air is guaranteed to be 99.97% (or better) free of viruses and other particles. So the risk, if there is one, does not come from the supplied air. It comes from other people.

  2. Ah, perfect. More dumb politicians grandstanding for their public image.

    Nothing like more bad government rules to try to save us from ourselves. Super.
    I am not wearing a mask in public, and certainly not on a plane. It’s disgusting.

    • Barry Graham Reply

      While I share your feelings, if it becomes the law, you won’t have a choice if you wish either to stay on the plane or avoid being arrested when you deplane – unless enough people join you.

    • Barry Graham Reply

      Also I don’t think anyone concerned with his image would be suggesting such an intrusive, unpopular and unproven measure.

  3. This is the toolbag who brought a bucket of fried chicken to a hearing.

    • Barry Graham Reply

      I sat a few feet a away from someone who was coughing frequently on the way back from London at the end of February and I did not catch anything, as far as I know. This was in addition to the flights there and the flight back here from New York. It isn’t generally agreed that masks help. Also for decades people have flown without getting sick despite countless viruses and bacteria circulating. I myself have been on hundreds of flights over the years and rarely got sick. The article I quoted above explains why. I agree this is one person’s opinion. But it’s an abuse of power to try to force these measures on us without having strong evidence and constituent support to back his position. Nor should this happen without government oversight, and without an exit strategy (not exiting the plane).

  4. Despite your personal views about masks on planes once the airline decides on a path you have two choices: comply and fly or do not comply and do not fly. Eventually you will not have a choice but to mask up and fly if Jet Blue and American are any indication.

    For those that feel masks are useless I challenge you to sit right now literally a foot from a known infected person for several hours and get back to me on how that works for you and your family. Honestly I can’t believe we are even having a conversation about the usefulness of masks. I literally wear one every day at work to protect myself from work related non virus exposures. To transition from a half or full face cartridge respirator to a fabric covering feels great. I will do so to protect you FROM me and to protect me FROM you. It’s not a hard concept and it demonstrates that I care for more than myself. Seems to be a foreign concept to most Americans.

    • Barry Graham Reply

      Because their use is based on fear not facts and is mostly to make people, that don’t understand this, feel better. WHO, IATA, Mayo Clinic and others all say that masks don’t do much to prevent spread of disease. G-d gave us a great immune system and if we were to stop exercising it by wearing masks (if they are effective) then it would become less effective.

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