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Good News – Bad News: Youth Are Potentially “Tourism’s Savior”

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Rene’s Points For Better Travel, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Rene’s Points For Better Travel and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


According to TravelDailyNews, a new study says youth — especially in the 18-34 range — could be a major catalyst in tourism’s rebound.

Based on the study’s findings, though, I think there’s good and bad.

(Also, how awesome is it that people up to 34 years old are considered “youth”?!)

The Good

Whenever something fun, educational, and worthwhile — like traveling — is passed down through generations, that’s a good thing.

I love that travel will continue to live (and hasn’t yet been “canceled”) Youth may, in fact, help it thrive again.

Plus, younger people seem eager to share their passions. Spreading the joys of travel is something I’ve seen many younger folks do effectively. They’re great about posting their travels and tips on social media.

The Bad

So why am I so concerned?

TravelDailyNews’ Tatiana Rokou said the study concludes, “Compared to travelers over the age of 55, travelers ages 18 – 34 are less likely to wait for a COVID-19 vaccine or acquired immunity.” (Bold mine.)

Ugh.

Of close friends and family that I personally know are traveling now, nearly all of them fall into that 18-34 age group. And there are also a few in their 50s who are hitting the roads. (Five people my wife and I know held a family meetup recently. All of them contracted coronavirus.)

Look, I haven’t traveled in almost six months. I miss it dearly. My livelihood depends, to a degree, on my visiting destinations and experiencing travel products such as airlines and hotels. But I currently have no plans to go anywhere until trusted COVID-19 vaccines and/or therapeutics are readily available.

And, no: not all people in a certain demographic (i.e. 18-34 behave the same, so I don’t want to make it seem like I’m over-generalizing).

Ms. Rokou further states:

Aizaz Sheikh, Global Marketing Director at G Adventures, says the company’s own research aligns with that of TourRadar, with millennials (25-39) more likely to travel first, with 20% saying they want to travel as soon as late-2020.

“In recognizing the different travel preferences of younger travelers we have created a dedicated Instagram feed for our ’18-to-Thirtysomethings’ travel style. The tone and images are different, as are the stories we tell. This is a generation that really wants to make a difference in the world, so they will not only be key to the return of travel, but also how we can travel in a more responsible way post-pandemic,” says Sheikh.

I sincerely appreciate this “generation … really wants to make a difference in the world.” But risking the spread of a deadly virus will make a change in the world — it’ll potentially kill more people.

— Chris

Featured image: ©iStock.com/ViewApart

Rene’s Points For Better Travel, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Rene’s Points For Better Travel and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


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2 Comments

  1. Hi Chris,

    How did the five people that you know and got the virus handle it? Personally, I do not know anyone that has been infected.

    Looking at the CDC data at the link below, the week of 7/18 had the highest COVID-19 death rate in the month of July. In the US, a total 1,994 people age 34 and younger died from all causes, and only 76 of these death were from COVID-19. Given that there are move than 140 million people in the US age 34 and younger, those are not bad odds. As long as they are not living with someone vulnerable, do not have any comorbidities, and take a few precautions, travel should be OK, and it really helps the economy. To the extent that they acquire some immunity, that helps the rest of us when we venture out.

    -Dave

    https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/covid_weekly/index.htm

    • They recovered on their own. A family member of ours died from COVID complications in May. And three more of our friends have it now.

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