Travel Related

Delta Lifts Ban on Pit Bulls, But Says No to Emotional Support Animals

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr
Rene’s Points For Better Travel, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Rene’s Points For Better Travel and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


Delta Air Lines announced today that certain “pit bull type dogs” will be allowed on its aircraft again — while also banning emotional support animals.

Plus, a Ryan Air commercial generated plenty of controversy (you’re shocked, I know).

Those are some of the day’s travel-related headlines I thought you, too, may find interesting.

Delta Throws Pit Bulls a Bone

Emotional support animals will no longer be allowed on Delta flights. Starting Monday, January 11, the airline will no longer accept new reservations involving emotional support animals. However, passengers with ESAs and have travel confirmed prior to January 11 are still OK.

Delta announced another notable change: pit bulls are again welcome on Delta flights. However, the “‘pit bull type dogs'” must “meet documentation requirements for trained service animals.” (Is a “pit bull type dog” a pooch who can sit at a keyboard and type? Because I know some people who’d hire them in a second for transcription services 🙂 )

Delta Air Lines will once again allow certain pit bulls on its flights.
(©Dave Mangels/DaveMangels.com)

“Delta will continue to deny boarding to any trained service animal that poses a threat or demonstrates aggressive or inappropriate behavior in a public setting.”

More Travel Headlines

‘Jab & Go’ Ryanair ad campaign investigated in the UK following complaints: ‘Distasteful’

Americans Still Visiting Mexico Despite COVID-19 Concerns

Minnesota’s Only National Park Was Just Named One of the World’s Best Spots for Stargazing

Fall asleep in Vienna, wake up in Paris – Europe’s night trains make a comeback

Korean Air Returns To Almost All North American Destinations

Featured image: Dave Mangels/DaveMangels.com

Rene’s Points For Better Travel, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Rene’s Points For Better Travel and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


Responses are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser's responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

2 Comments

  1. Bite me. Until it becomes mandatory that handler/dog teams carry nationally-recognized certification, passengers and crew will continue to be at risk. Certification is proof that teams have received extensive training and have passed rigorous tests. There is very little chance a certified team will pose a risk or be a nuisance to the public. Teams should also be required to carry a $3 million liability policy to protect others should the unthinkable occur.

Write A Comment

BoardingArea