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How Many Cruise Ships Will Be Scrapped Due to COVID-19? What Happens to Them All?

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Rene’s Points For Better Travel, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Rene’s Points For Better Travel and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


My visit to the airplane graveyard (bone yard) with a number of frequent flyers a few years back was eye-opening.

Between Pima and the airport between Tucson and Phoenix that Delta uses to park old jets, there are hundreds of millions of dollars (when new) of jets parked to either one day again enter service or have parts harvested while others will simply be scrapped. Sad.

Now, don’t get me wrong – I am not the kind of guy who drives a classic car and pines for the “days gone by.” I am happy to get on a brand new A350 or buy a brand new car when I need one and sell my old one with only the slightest tear for all the miles gone by.

But when it comes to cruise ships, I feel a different emotion.

Last month, CNN Travel posted an article I added to my blogging “save” folder. I just had to share it with you and post some of my thoughts.

First off, like old jets, we are seeing reports of a large number of ships being retired this year (large as a percentage of cruise ships on the seas, that is). While it is not uncommon for ships to start life with one line to then move to another line and be refurbished (like Delta has done for years with old jets), now more will simply be scrapped this year due to COVID-19.

One of the most striking lines from the article to me was:

“… the crew will wait until tidal conditions are right and then deliberately run the ship aground on the beach.”

CNN.com

What a horrid thing to do – intentionally – to what once was a floating luxury hotel and restaurant with endless entertainment. Well, I guess, not really endless. 🙁

It went on to say about this place:

On the 10-mile stretch of beach, up to 200 ships can be demolished at one time, making it look like Armageddon or something out of a science fiction movie.”

CNN.com

I morbidly searched for a drone video of a flyover of the above but could only find one from land that gives you an idea of the scale of the operation.

Are there bits from old ships I would like to have or have on display in my home or office? Maybe. I can see in a “man cave” the bar from, say, the Haven being ultra-cool to show off. Maybe some of the art reminding you of the trips you have taken? As to the rest, chairs that have had thousands sitting in them has zero appeal. 😉

I do not see the appeal of turning old ships into floating hotels (i.e. permanently docked like the Queen Mary in Long Beach, California, you see at the top of the post). Cruise ship rooms are OK because you are floating from place to place and spend most of your time outside the rooms. Intentionally booking one just as a hotel? Meh.

What do you think about all of this? Are you sad to see old ships end their lives cut to bits and recycled? Did you know this is how so many ships end their lives? Let me know. – René

 

Rene’s Points For Better Travel, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Rene’s Points For Better Travel and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


Responses are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser's responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

René de Lambert is a contributing writer and the founder of RenesPoints. He is an avid Delta and SkyTeam flyer who has held Delta’s top Diamond Medallion status for many years and flown millions of miles.

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